Roseburg Travel Log #1

        Hey, y'all. This is my first post in a long time. Life got busy and the blog had to take a back seat. But in that time, I've been shooting photos so there should be more posts in the next few weeks.

     Anyway, before my life got busy, I was able to visit my home town Roseburg, Oregon. "Is that close to Portland?" That is a great question, hypothetical reader. No, it's not close to Portland. It's a small logging town in southwestern Oregon. And when I say it's a small town, I mean it's a redneck, Toby-Keith-loving, cow-tipping, I-have-never-left-this-county-in-my-life, small town.

     It's also a beautiful place to live. Nestled in a steep, tree covered valley, Roseburg is about an hour from the ocean and an hour from the Cascade mountains. To me it's still home and I love going back whenever I can.

This is my buddy, Paddy. Trips with him almost never go to plan. On this trip we were going to driving to a trailhead and hike into a picturesque mountain lake. What we didn't plan on was getting stuck in axle deep snow. With the light fading, we moved to plan B. If we couldn't have a picturesque lake, we could at least have a picturesque waterfall. 

This is my buddy, Paddy. Trips with him almost never go to plan. On this trip we were going to driving to a trailhead and hike into a picturesque mountain lake. What we didn't plan on was getting stuck in axle deep snow. With the light fading, we moved to plan B. If we couldn't have a picturesque lake, we could at least have a picturesque waterfall. 

This is why when people ask me if I like Southern California I say "It's pretty cool, but I really miss living in Oregon."

This is why when people ask me if I like Southern California I say "It's pretty cool, but I really miss living in Oregon."

A twig hanging in the creek.

A twig hanging in the creek.

 Steve Harris is one of the hardest working people I know. A saddle maker, leather braider, cowboy, author, judoka, mentor, father, husband. He even know's his way around a blacksmiths forge and can make a mean cup of coffee.

 Steve Harris is one of the hardest working people I know. A saddle maker, leather braider, cowboy, author, judoka, mentor, father, husband. He even know's his way around a blacksmiths forge and can make a mean cup of coffee.

When your saddle needs some pew pew.

When your saddle needs some pew pew.

Steve's hands are as tough as the leather that he works.

Steve's hands are as tough as the leather that he works.

I couldn't decide if I liked the color version or the black and white version more. So I put them both in. What do y'all like?

I couldn't decide if I liked the color version or the black and white version more. So I put them both in. What do y'all like?

Whenever I visit Steve I always end up doing some work for him. Steve laid out a grey wool blanket and suggested that I shoot some photos of his hackamores (a bitless bridle that fits around a horses muzzle.)

Whenever I visit Steve I always end up doing some work for him. Steve laid out a grey wool blanket and suggested that I shoot some photos of his hackamores (a bitless bridle that fits around a horses muzzle.)

These are the first product photos I've ever taken. I wanted to get a variety of shots to show the overall shape and construction as well as close up shots to highlight the detail of the braiding.

These are the first product photos I've ever taken. I wanted to get a variety of shots to show the overall shape and construction as well as close up shots to highlight the detail of the braiding.

I also tried a little freelensing to show some of the detail.

I also tried a little freelensing to show some of the detail.

 I got pretty lucky with the lighting. The door was about three feet away from my set up. I opened it up and had nice, diffused sunlight. A few of the shots needed some fill light so I used a bendy desk lamp. The color temperatures of the two light sources don't match up but I don't think that It takes anything away from the pictures.

 I got pretty lucky with the lighting. The door was about three feet away from my set up. I opened it up and had nice, diffused sunlight. A few of the shots needed some fill light so I used a bendy desk lamp. The color temperatures of the two light sources don't match up but I don't think that It takes anything away from the pictures.

Nothing like spending a cold morning in the saddle shop.

Nothing like spending a cold morning in the saddle shop.